Posted by

Tags:

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrDigg thisShare on StumbleUpon
dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-03 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-01 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-02 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-04 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-05 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-06 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-07 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-08 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-09 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-10 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-11 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-12 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-13 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-14 dynamic-dancer-photography-portraits-alexander-yakovlev-epistrophy-15

 

We love this incredible series of images show the amazing attention to detail and strive for perfection by dancers amidst their passionate performances. Photography at its best, these stills let us savor a powerful moment of each motion which would otherwise go by very, very quickly. With the addition of flour thrown in the air, Yakovlev gives another dimension to his images and shows the space his dancers fill with their graceful movements.

Alexander Yakovlev is based in Moscow and although he has a law degree, it is quite clear that his true passion is photography. You can see a lot more of his work at 500px and Yakovlev’s website. He also shoots athletes, as well as fitness and yoga professionals.

Posted by

Tags:

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrDigg thisShare on StumbleUpon
hula_outside_epistrophy_01 hula_outside_epistrophy_02 hula_outside_epistrophy_03 hula_outside_epistrophy_04 hula_outside_epistrophy_05 hula_outside_epistrophy_06 hula_outside_epistrophy_07 hula_outside_epistrophy_08 hula_outside_epistrophy_09 hula_outside_epistrophy_10 hula_outside_epistrophy_11

Artist Sean Yoro aka Hula uses his paddle boat to get to and float on while creating his unique portraits. Placed on hard-to-reach, semi-submerged and derelict walls, the paintings appear to be floating murals of women bathing in the blue waters. With their hyperrealistic qualities, the images can be seen and recognized from a great distance and their perfect reflections in the still waters they make a unique sight in its setting.
Originally from Hawaii, Sean Yoro aka Hula is currently based in NYC and has a background in using graffiti and watercolors in his earlier works but took up painting seriously after drawing the body at the age of 21.

Find out more about him and his work at Hula’s website.

Posted by

Tags:

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrDigg thisShare on StumbleUpon

Colossus by Pat Vale from BigAnimal on Vimeo.

epistrophy, skyline, nyc, pencil drawing skyline-drawing-epistrophy-03 skyline-drawing-epistrophy-04 skyline-drawing-mergesmaller-epistrophy-01

Patrick Vale – a UK based artist has produced another one of his incredible NYC skyline drawings and taken a stunning video record of it with the video entitled “Colossus”. The vantage point for his super detailed and intricate drawing is the viewing deck at Rockefeller Center, which according to experienced tourists is one of the best high points to experience the density and whole vide of the city. Patrick took several images and made hand-sketches of the work in this video on a trip in December of 2014 during a time of the year when it was -15C or 5F outside. He then went back and created this extraordinary video which captures even the finest grains of the city’s three-dimensional grid. Enjoy the video and see the way such an intricate piece is created through planning and lots of layers one upon the other.

Make sure to also see Patrick’s other videos and great collection of images from earlier projects including Empire State of Pen, done from the roof deck of the Empire State building.

Music by John Barber.

Via Pat Vale’s website and Archdaily.

Posted by

Tags:

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrDigg thisShare on StumbleUpon
b&w couples 1 b&w couples 2 b&w couples 3 b&w couples 4 b&w couples 5 b&w couples 6 b&w couples 7 b&w couples 8 b&w couples 9 b&w couples 10 b&w couples 11 b&w couples 12 b&w couples 13 b&w couples 14 b&w couples 15 b&w couples 16 b&w couples 17 b&w couples 18 b&w couples 19 b&w couples 20 b&w couples 21 b&w couples 22 b&w couples 23 b&w couples 24 b&w couples 25

For once, the excitement, the bright red wrapping, pink hearted decals, the smell of sweet perfume and fluffy cuteness surrounding Valentine’s day didn’t leave us untouched. Hence, we decided to dedicate a post this sometimes controversial holiday. Love is everywhere around us and every day should be a celebration of the magical curse that’s been thrown upon us.

In his book, French Kiss – a Love Letter to Paris , the american photographer Peter Turnley presents a collection of couples who crossed the artist’s way in bars, cafes and the narrow streets of Paris over the course of 40 years. Warm and genuine, the black and white photography visually translates the romantic stories witnessed by Turnley in the capital of love.

The artist who shares his time between New York and Paris, also teaches photography workshops on street photography and the photo-essay in Paris, Cuba, New York, Mumbai, Venice, Sicily, and Lisbon. You can find more information about the upcoming workshops here.

Posted by

Tags:

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrDigg thisShare on StumbleUpon
Skarphedinn _Thrainsson_Iceland_Ice_Caves_Epistrophy_01

Skarphedinn _Thrainsson_Iceland_Ice_Caves_Epistrophy_02 Skarphedinn _Thrainsson_Iceland_Ice_Caves_Epistrophy_03 Skarphedinn _Thrainsson_Iceland_Ice_Caves_Epistrophy_04 Skarphedinn _Thrainsson_Iceland_Ice_Caves_Epistrophy_05 Skarphedinn _Thrainsson_Iceland_Ice_Caves_Epistrophy_06 Skarphedinn _Thrainsson_Iceland_Ice_Caves_Epistrophy_07 Skarphedinn _Thrainsson_Iceland_Ice_Caves_Epistrophy_08 Skarphedinn _Thrainsson_Iceland_Ice_Caves_Epistrophy_09 Skarphedinn _Thrainsson_Iceland_Ice_Caves_Epistrophy_10 Skarphedinn _Thrainsson_Iceland_Ice_Caves_Epistrophy_11 Skarphedinn _Thrainsson_Iceland_Ice_Caves_Epistrophy_12 Skarphedinn _Thrainsson_Iceland_Ice_Caves_Epistrophy_13
Icelandic photographer Skarphedinn Thrainsson (or just Skarpi) has captured a series of astounding photographs of his country’s ice caves. The images whith their translucent, blue forms can surprise even those familiar with Iceland’s uniquely rugged landscapes. The photographer’s work, which mostly features scenes from the country’s landscapes ranges from volcanoes and waterfalls to incredible Aurora Borealis shots.

All images courtesy of Skarphedinn Thrainsson.

Via Skarphedinn Thrainsson and MyModernMet.

Posted by

Tags:

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrDigg thisShare on StumbleUpon

dustin-yellin-NYC-ballet-lincoln-center-Epistrophy-01 dustin-yellin-NYC-ballet-lincoln-center-Epistrophy-02 dustin-yellin-NYC-ballet-lincoln-center-Epistrophy-03 dustin-yellin-NYC-ballet-lincoln-center-Epistrophy-04 dustin-yellin-NYC-ballet-lincoln-center-Epistrophy-05

New York City Ballet has chosen Brooklyn based artist Dustin Yellin to fill in the central hall as part of this year’s installation series. Each of the fifteen glass cubes is made of individual layers of glass, painstakingly painted and put together with mixed media, one by one to form a striking three-dimensional drawing which appears to be floating in the transparent volume. The artist’s distinct style of painting and collage, which resembles explosions of motion and color convey the act of performing – an expressive depiction of dedication to the audience.

The crystalline objects glowing in main space of the David H. Koch will be the center piece of this winter’s series and visitors will get a chance to walk around them freely.

Make sure to watch the video which not only gives a great insight on the process of this layering of images into three-dimensional form but also talks about the concepts and references that the artist makes through this work.

Via Dustin Yellin and Designboom

Posted by

Tags:

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrDigg thisShare on StumbleUpon
viviennegucwa-nyc-snowstorm-2015-epistrophy-01 viviennegucwa-nyc-snowstorm-2015-epistrophy-02 viviennegucwa-nyc-snowstorm-2015-epistrophy-03 viviennegucwa-nyc-snowstorm-2015-epistrophy-04 viviennegucwa-nyc-snowstorm-2015-epistrophy-05 viviennegucwa-nyc-snowstorm-2015-epistrophy-06 viviennegucwa-nyc-snowstorm-2015-epistrophy-07 viviennegucwa-nyc-snowstorm-2015-epistrophy-08 viviennegucwa-nyc-snowstorm-2015-epistrophy-09 viviennegucwa-nyc-snowstorm-2015-epistrophy-10 viviennegucwa-nyc-snowstorm-2015-epistrophy-11

The “biggest snowstorm in New York’s history” turned out to be a giant flop but apparently something did come out of it. Vivienne Gucwa who’s been photographing the city for over a decade captured these extremely rare images of city streets completely empty of people and cars.

In Vivienne’s own words: “What made this storm stand out versus other storms was that there was a ban on all vehicles aside from snow plows and emergency services. This meant that there were almost no cars on the streets. I have been photographing New York City during snowstorms for the last five years and it’s the first time I have ever experienced streets that were eerily empty. There wasn’t even the comforting presence of taxi cabs in the streets!

“The few people who were out were freely wandering in the middle of typically busy avenues and streets which made this storm extra special and fun to experience.

“New York City is a city that is constantly evolving in one way or the other. Having grown up in New York City, there is a palpable tension that I have experienced my whole life where nostalgia constantly bumps heads with the rapid rate of change that occurs in every aspect of life here. I absolutely love this tension. It makes photographing and writing about the city a bittersweet challenge.”

Via MyModernMet

Posted by

Tags:

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrDigg thisShare on StumbleUpon
Chocolate-Sculptural-Truffles-Epistrophy-01 Chocolate-Nendo-Sculptural-Truffles-Epistrophy-02 Chocolate-Nendo-Sculptural-Truffles-Epistrophy-03 Chocolate-Nendo-Sculptural-Truffles-Epistrophy-04 Chocolate-Nendo-Sculptural-Truffles-Epistrophy-05 Chocolate-Nendo-Sculptural-Truffles-Epistrophy-06 Chocolate-Nendo-Sculptural-Truffles-Epistrophy-07 Chocolate-Sculptural-Truffles-Epistrophy-08 Chocolate-Sculptural-Truffles-Epistrophy-09 Chocolate-Sculptural-Truffles-Epistrophy-10 Chocolate-Sculptural-Truffles-Epistrophy-11 Chocolate-Sculptural-Truffles-Epistrophy-12 Chocolate-Sculptural-Truffles-Epistrophy-13

Prolific and talented Japanese design studio Nendo, whose work we’ve featured several times at Epistrophy recently unveiled a line of edible chocolate truffles. Cleverly titled Chocolatexture, the nine distinct sculptural shapes each feature a special flavor of cocoa and a very memorable corresponding name.
Oki Sato, leader of the Milan and Tolyo-based company Nendo, stated: “The 9 different types of chocolate are made within the same size, 26x26x26mm, featuring pointed tips, hollow interiors, smooth or rough surface textures.” “And while the raw materials are identical, the distinctive textures create different tastes.” Moreover, each of the chocolate types were inspired by an onomatopoeic word from the Japanese language that describes texture. The chocolates correspond with words like “toge toge” (sharp pointy tips), “sube sube” (smooth edges and corners) and “zara zara” (granular, like a file).

The project was done for Maison & Objet bi-annual fair.

Previous stories on Nendo you can find here and here.

Via Freshome

Posted by

Tags:

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrDigg thisShare on StumbleUpon
jeffrey-vanhoutte-dancers-powdered-milk-epistrophy-01 jeffrey-vanhoutte-dancers-powdered-milk-epistrophy-02 jeffrey-vanhoutte-dancers-powdered-milk-epistrophy-03


jeffrey-vanhoutte-dancers-powdered-milk-epistrophy-04

jeffrey-vanhoutte-dancers-powdered-milk-epistrophy-05


jeffrey-vanhoutte-dancers-powdered-milk-epistrophy-06

jeffrey-vanhoutte-dancers-powdered-milk-epistrophy-07 jeffrey-vanhoutte-dancers-powdered-milk-epistrophy-08

Belgian photographer Jeffrey Vanhoutte has turned a simple milk creamer ad campaign into an extraordinary piece of art. He teamed up with dancer Noi Pakon to create a series of breath-taking photographs exploring motion, stillness, shadow and form. The powdered creamer produced by the Dutch company Kievit was used as a medium – fine granules of milk – to describe and enhance the movements of the dancer in space. In some of the last images and the video which was produced during the making of the photographs reveals an equally intriguing process from behind the scenes. The project was done in collaboration with film direction Andrè (who’s btw always ready to kick your ass!). A special, very fast flash was also used to “freeze” the particles in space as the dancer performed her movements.