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Be sure to check out the awesome video of this striking performance by New Movement Collective. The UK based performance troupe was commissioned by the new arts organization Stone nest to mark the end of a period of inactivity for a Grade II listed chapel in London.

Dance, architecture, animation and interactive light technologies blend in a powerful mix to recreate the adventures in Homer’s classic work, The Odyssey. In the spirit of the highly successful “Sleep No More” performance in NYC, the Nest engages the audience and places them in the center of the action. Through movement and light the spectators discover simultaneously new chapters of the story as well as hidden spaces of the medieval chapel.

About NMC:

A collective of new generation choreographers with a long collaborative working history, both as dancers and dance-makers with Europe’s leading ballet and contemporary companies.

Developing work that is directly presented in response to different and unusual theatrical settings, NMC aims to challenge the notions of traditional performance and evolve the landscape of contemporary theatre.

With a strong commitment to collaborative working methods between dance, architecture, film and music, NMC is dedicated to unlocking the performance potential within the hidden pockets of our cities.

Via New Movement Collective.

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We created Epistrophy as a space where art, architecture, music and design can influence each-other and build off of the knowledge that each of those fields acquires daily.  We believe that such a ground for exchanging ideas is critical for their advancement, and that’s why we don’t share just what is viral on the web but projects and articles that always have a spatial component to them, challenge the status quo and are visually arresting.

We need help in finding those articles and projects, daily! Send us materials of projects you’ve found, send us your work at thepistrophy@gmail.com

Sincerely,

Epistrophy team

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Oyler Wu Collective:

“The proposal is aimed at creating a three-dimensional spatial experience to activate the urban environment, one that capitalizes directly on the inherent spatial characteristics of line. By using a semi-repetitious field of twisting “surfaces,” the proposal moves back and forth between complex field and coherent geometric pattern. Ultimately, we’re interested in the transcendence of line into a completely engulfing experience- one that can be occupied as a kind of three-dimensional drawing. This ambition is aimed at creating a level of curiosity about the piece- where the way of taking it in moves from geometrical object, to a sense of enclosure, to a dynamic field of shifting trajectories.

The design process began with a simple two-dimensional plane with a series of patterns, consisting of line-work, drawn across the surface. That surface is then repeated in space, creating six planes, each offset a distance of 177 centimeters from another, forming a perfect cube. As the planes within that cube are offset, each transforms, requiring the planes of lines to adapt, twist, and contort in order to maintain a connective relationship with the next. This creates cavities of space formed by continuously warping planes that reach deep into the volume. Eventually, the planes spill out of the volume, lifting the volume into the air, becoming structural supports for the now precariously tilted volume of lines.”

Via Oyler Wu Collaborative

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Photo Courtesy of Antal Gabelics

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Photo Courtesy of Antal Gabelics

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Photo Courtesy of Antal Gabelics

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Photo Courtesy of Antal Gabelics

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Photo Courtesy of Antal Gabelics

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Photo Courtesy of Antal Gabelics

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Photo Courtesy of Antal Gabelics

Antal Gabelics: “This project expands on the idea of how tourism affects the spiritual experience of the temples of Angkor. I wanted to explore the interrelation of traditional past and developing present at Angkor, and questions what they mean for the future of this historical and sacred site. Originally reserved for religious activities, these structures are now some of the greatest tourist attractions in the world. These timelapse-loop videos meld the experience of tourism at Angkor into surreal, kaleidoscopic images and sequences inspired by Theravada Buddhist mandalas, in which the frenetic activity of backpack-toting tourists passes like the shadows of ever moving clouds over the weathered, ancient stones.”

Video and editing: Antal Gabelics

Music: Pantha Du Prince – Mad Rush Organ Remix (Rework: Philip Glass Remixed) edited by Ákos Turzai.